Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Peterson Space Observer

Security forces patrol identifies security mistakes

From 21st Security Forces Squadron

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — The 21st Security Forces Squadron recently began a new initiative to identify and educate base residents of security shortcomings that can lead to them becoming a victim of a crime.

When considering crime rates across the country, or even locally, Air Force bases seem relatively free of serious crimes against people and property. However, this doesn’t mean that base residents are immune to crime.

Victims of crime may suffer physical injuries and financial losses. Criminal activity is not only costly to the victim, but it can adversely affect the good order and discipline required to effectively carry out the Air Force mission.

To combat the effects of crime on base, the 21st SFS went on patrol Aug. 6 and Oct. 14 to look for “easy money.” The patrols went into the base residential areas and work centers to identify and evaluate potential opportunities for criminal activity. When found, the patrol left a card at the residence or vehicle identifying the security flaw to improve security and help protect the base.

A total of 83 cards were distributed during these patrols, some identifying multiple vulnerabilities. In some instances, GPS units, MP3 players and cell phones were left in plain sight in an unlocked vehicle.

21st SFS findings included:

Base Housing

  • Seven vehicles were left obviously unsecured.
  • Five vehicles left valuables in plain sight.
  • Five garages were left open without an owner in sight.
  • Three yards left valuables in plain sight.

Dormitory Areas

  • Ten vehicles were left obviously unsecured.
  • Thirteen vehicles left valuables in plain sight.

Work Centers

  • Seventeen vehicles were left obviously unsecured.
  • Eleven vehicles left valuables in plain sight.
  • Seventeen vehicles were both obviously unsecured, and had valuables in sight.

Residents and workers who found one of these cards should take appropriate measures to correct the finding and protect their property.

“We all bear some responsibility in protecting our property from crime,” said Tim Omdal, 21st SFS air provost marshal. “Crime exists everywhere — including on base. The 21st SFS works diligently every day to minimize that crime, but we all play a part in keeping the base safe.”

Lock your doors and keep valuables out of sight. As always, if you witness a crime in progress on base, call Crime Stop at 556-4357 or the law enforcement desk at 556-4000.

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