Need books? Check out the bookmobile

Bookmobiles provide personalized library services to populations that do not have easy access to other library facilities due to geographic, physical, and/or cultural barriers or isolated locations. The 32-foot mobile library visits 10-10:45 a.m. Thursdays at Schriever Child Development Center and 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Fridays at the community center. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Erica Picariello)

By Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

If your excuse for not reading a book is the library is too far, don’t fret. The Pikes Peak Library District bookmobile travels to Schriever Air Force Base to sustain your bibliophilic needs.

“The bookmobiles provide personalized library services to populations that do not have easy access to other library facilities due to geographic, physical, and/or cultural barriers or isolated locations,” said Vickie Sherwood, Pikes Peak Library District mobile library services coordinator.

In 1954, the service was established when the district library was still the Colorado Springs Public Library. The service area of Pikes Peak Library District is 2,090 square miles with a population of 585,158 residents. In 2008, the department’s name changed to Mobile Library Services to better describe the inclusiveness of the service.

The 32-foot mobile library visits 10-10:45 a.m. Thursdays at Schriever Child Development Center and 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Fridays at the community center.

In addition to books for children, teens and adults, each vehicle is stocked with a variety of materials such as music CDs, CD-books, Playaways in MP3 format, DVDs, electronic games and magazines. The collection held on the bookmobile ranges between 4,000 and 4,500 items.

“Nonfiction books for adults are available, as well as popular fiction, science fiction, mysteries, Westerns and large print titles,” Sherwood said. “Also offered are juvenile nonfiction and fiction, picture books, board books and teen books.”

An average of 35 children and their caregivers visit the bookmobile during its 45-minute stop at the Schriever Child Development Center. An additional 25 residents visit Fridays when the book library stops by the community center.

As one of the customers, Lisa Barnett, CDC administrative support clerk, said the bookmobile helps children with their cognitive skills since it gives them opportunity to read books that are not available at the center.

“I think it’s an awesome opportunity for the children and staff to be able to interact and borrow books from the bookmobile staff,” Barnett said. “It really benefits us.”

To use the bookmobile, individuals must present a PPLD library card in good standing. Free library cards, available through the bookmobile staff, may be obtained by showing a photo ID and proof of residence. This library card allows the holder access not only to the bookmobile and other PPLD facilities, but also to the databases and the CyberShelf at www.ppld.org. Cardholders may check their accounts online and also place their own holds. If the bookmobile is selected as the pick-up library, the requested materials will be brought to the Schriever stops.

“Residents and employees at Schriever AFB may feel isolated from the Colorado Springs community at times when the 13 miles between Schriever and Peterson AFB or High Prairie Community Library in Falcon are insurmountable,” Sherwood said. “The bookmobile will continue to bring the benefits of Pikes Peak Library District to the Schriever AFB community.”

For more information, visit www.ppld.org.

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