22 SOPS hosts Cyberspace Operations Officer Luncheon
By Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez 50th Space Wing Public Affairs Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. — Schriever Air Force Base cyberspace officers gathered at... 22 SOPS hosts Cyberspace Operations Officer Luncheon
U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez Col. Scott Angerman, 50th Network Operations Group commander, spoke with 50th Space Wing cyberspace officers during a Cyberspace Operations Officer Luncheon Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. COOL, a new event hosted by the 22nd Space Operations Squadron, began in January and is scheduled to occur monthly.

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez
Col. Scott Angerman, 50th Network Operations Group commander, spoke with 50th Space Wing cyberspace officers during a Cyberspace Operations Officer Luncheon Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. COOL, a new event hosted by the 22nd Space Operations Squadron, began in January and is scheduled to occur monthly.

By Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. — Schriever Air Force Base cyberspace officers gathered at the Satellite Dish Dining Facility for a Cyberspace Operations Officer Luncheon Feb. 15.

The luncheon informed cyberspace officers about efforts to defend networks and mission systems, and provided leadership insight on cyberspace growth in the Air Force. It also furthered the wing’s vision of evolving the force, driving innovation and mastering space.

The 22nd Space Operations Squadron hosted the luncheon that featured Col. Scott Angerman, 50th Network Operations Group commander, as the guest speaker.

“I’ve realized Schriever is a unique base,” said 2nd Lt. Ryan Howe, 22 SOPS cyberspace operations officer and luncheon coordinator. “The cyberspace officers here are doing many different jobs; it’s a great opportunity to meet with each other and get on the same page to see how cyber is developing.”

The event, more commonly known as COOL, was first held in January and is scheduled to occur monthly.

Certain topics during the luncheon included evaluation reports, promotion boards and future changes to cyberspace units.

“Cyber operations continue to evolve,” Angerman said. “As cyberspace officers go forward it is critical to understand both the missions on base, and how cyber contributions are enablers and force multipliers. No matter what organization you are assigned to, the most important networking you can accomplish is with your peers and mission partners. Become the expert.”

Angerman also discussed an ongoing cyber strategy to defend 50 SW mission systems critical to space power, as well as an effort to track cyberspace officer jobs, in order to maximize development opportunities and multiple assignments while at Schriever.

“What stood out to me was when we talked about the commanders gathering together to prioritize the development path for the cyberspace officers on base,” Howe said. “When it comes time for a board to meet, they would decide what the officers’ next jobs should be and will try to get them unique opportunities, but also put them in a position to succeed based on prior experience. From a company grade officer’s perspective, that is very beneficial.”

The next COOL is scheduled for March 13.

“At Schriever we do many unique jobs in our units,” Howe said. “It’s hard to get a read on some of the other missions on-base and what the different cyberspace officers are doing, however, the luncheons enlighten us on that. Before this, there wasn’t an avenue for networking but this provides that opportunity. Even though this is a new program, I can see how networking here, and understanding what individuals do, opens doors for working with others on future tasks.”

Staff Writer