Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Peterson Space Observer

Priorities: Moore sets his agenda in first Commander’s Call

(U.S. Air Force photo by Robb Lingley) PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Col. Todd Moore, 21st Space Wing commander, held his first commander’s call in the base auditorium at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., July 21, 2017. Moore projected his vision for the future of the wing to fellow Airmen.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Robb Lingley) PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Col. Todd Moore, 21st Space Wing commander, held his first commander’s call in the base auditorium at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., July 21, 2017. Moore projected his vision for the future of the wing to fellow Airmen.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Robb Lingley)
PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. – Col. Todd Moore, 21st Space Wing commander, held his first commander’s call in the base auditorium at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., July 21, 2017. Moore projected his vision for the future of the wing to fellow Airmen.

By Dave Smith

21st Space Wing Public Affairs staff writer

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — Col. Todd Moore, 21st Space Wing commander, relayed his priorities for the wing during his first commander’s call July 20, 2017 at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. Moore assumed command on July 11, 2017.

Moore started the call by showing a picture of the Normandy beach cemetery in France where more than 9,000 U.S. service members are buried, saying the preparedness and readiness of the 21st SW is crucial to prevent the need for such a place. His priorities reflected that statement.

One of his first major priorities is always driving to accomplish the mission through discipline and training.

“Don’t be afraid to do hard things to make the mission better or to take care of each other. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes,” Moore said. “You learn from them.”

His words reflected the recent opinion of Gen. John Hyten, U.S. Strategic Command commander, quoted in National Defense Magazine in June. Hyten took issue with an overly cautious approach to modernizing the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

Another high priority for the new commander is Airmen and family wellness.

“You need to be able to spin down,” Moore said. “Work will always be there. You are not a machine, your wellness helps us get the mission done.”

Strength is important to wellness he said, but not just physical strength.

“A huge sign of strength is knowing when to ‘cry uncle,’” said Moore. “(It’s) knowing when to ask for help. It’s knowing when you are exhausted, too.”

Squadrons are also a priority item for Moore. Squadrons set and maintain standards, he said, so leaders and members of the squadron are expected to so the same.

“Don’t stop thinking about how to do it differently, don’t stop being aggressive,” said Moore. “What’s great about squadrons is they never forget what the objective is.”

Throughout his presentation Moore expressed a desire for openness where leadership is concerned.

“Do not be afraid to engage and talk with leadership,” he said. “Ask me and engage with me. You can approach me at any point.”

Moore began his Air Force career dedicated to becoming an A-10 Thunderbolt pilot, but things change when a cardiologist told him he was disqualified from flying he was offered a career in space operations.

He enthusiastically followed that path. After many rewarding assignments including the National Reconnaissance Office, the Pentagon, Naval War College, and Royal Air Force Menwith Hill, he was selected to be the next Wing commander.

“And then I popped out the other end of this incredible adventure here at the 21st Space Wing,” said Moore. “It’s a dream come true.”

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