Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Schriever Sentinel

AF special duties offer Airmen career enhancement

Master Sgt. Cassandra Bushyeager, 50th Force Support Squadron, career assistance advisor, speaks to some Airmen about being a training instructor during a special duty assignment workshop at the First Term Airman Center Feb. 19. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

Master Sgt. Cassandra Bushyeager, 50th Force Support Squadron, career assistance advisor, speaks to some Airmen about being a training instructor during a special duty assignment workshop at the First Term Airman Center Feb. 19. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez)

By Staff Sgt. Daniel Martinez

50th Space Wing Public Affairs
Have you ever wanted to be a recruiter, a training instructor, or maybe even a first sergeant but didn’t know where to go and how to start?
A panel of Schriever Airmen answered those questions and shared their experiences Feb. 19 during a special duty assignment workshop in the First Term Airman Center.
“We wanted to have personnel with prior special duty experience available to the base population,” said Master Sgt. Cassandra Bushyeager, 50th Force Support Squadron. “The panel members were able to express their personal experience and provide firsthand knowledge to Airmen interested in trying their hand at a new job.”
Sergeant Bushyeager, who once served as a Security Forces Academy Technical Training Instructor and is currently Schriever’s career assistance advisor, said special duties provide Airmen opportunities for career enhancement. In addition to Sergeant Bushyeager’s experience, the panel members shared an array of special duty knowledge spanning various jobs including curriculum developer, training instructor, first sergeant, Airman and Family Readiness Center NCO-in charge, silver flag alpha instructor, and recruiter.
The insight provided by panel members merely scratches the surface of available jobs. Sergeant Bushyeager said there are many more job choices available for interested Airmen.
“If they want to do some homework first about a job, they can access the Special Duty Assignment Guide on the Air Force Personnel Center Web site,” she said. “There they can see the prerequisites for sixty-nine special duty assignments.”
Airmen who attended the workshop were given the opportunity to engage panel members and ask questions after each panel member introduced themselves and provided a personal account of their experiences.
One Airman said the workshop was a good way to see what the Air Force has to offer and found a new perspective just listening to the panel members.
“I’m trying to put myself in their shoes and just trying to get a feel for it before I put in for a special duty,” said Senior Airman Samantha Benifield, 50th FSS, NCO-in charge of evaluations. “I want to be a personnel instructor but I’m still kind of considering it and thinking about it.”
Sergeant Bushyeager added that there are many rewards and possibilities in fulfilling a special duty.
“Working in a special duty assignment offers a multitude of opportunities for Airmen,” she said. “For instance, several special duties require a Community College of the Air Force degree within a year of starting the job. For many members, they continue on with their education as they are in the student mindset. Traveling around the world is also a benefit of special duty assignments like postal or courier duty.”
As for her current special duty, she added, “I love this job because I get to help people with their career. Whether it’s retraining counseling, teaching professional writing, or working with the first-term Airmen, knowing that I may have helped someone is the reward.”
For more information about special duties, contact Sergeant Bushyeager at 567-5927.
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