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Peterson Space Observer

Intel flight realigns in 21st Operations Group

Lt. Col. Troy Endicott, 21st Operations Support Squadron commander, “hands over” the Intelligence Flight, whose members are to his right, to Col. Nina Armagno, 21st Operations Group commander, during a transition ceremony Jan. 31 on Peterson Air Force Base. Colonel Endicott called it a pivotal ceremony as the intelligence flight moves from the 21 OSS to a new section within the 21 OG called Operations Group Intelligence. He told Colonel Armagno she was inheriting “the cream of the crop.” (U.S. Air Force photo/Dennis Howk)

Lt. Col. Troy Endicott, 21st Operations Support Squadron commander, “hands over” the Intelligence Flight, whose members are to his right, to Col. Nina Armagno, 21st Operations Group commander, during a transition ceremony Jan. 31 on Peterson Air Force Base. Colonel Endicott called it a pivotal ceremony as the intelligence flight moves from the 21 OSS to a new section within the 21 OG called Operations Group Intelligence. He told Colonel Armagno she was inheriting “the cream of the crop.” (U.S. Air Force photo/Dennis Howk)

by Monica Mendoza

21st Space Wing Public Affairs staff writer

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.  — Members of the 21st Operations Support Squadron Intelligence Flight stood at attention as Col. Nina Armagno, 21st Operations Group commander, assumed control of their flight in a transition ceremony Jan. 31 on Peterson Air Force Base.

It was a noteworthy event as the 21st Space Wing reorganized its intelligence management as directed by the Secretary of the Air Force. It’s a realignment that streamlines the organizing, training and equipping of intelligence personnel. And, it’s a move that makes sense, Colonel Armagno said.

“With over 1,750 personnel at 17 units in five countries across nine time zones around the globe, world-wide intelligence support is vital to the success of our mission areas of missile warning, missile defense and space control,” she said.

Under the realignment, the operational wing senior intelligence officer moves from the 21st OSS to a new section within the 21st Operations Group staff, dubbed Operations Group Intelligence.

“The new organization, OGI, will continue its fantastic support for all intelligence functions formerly handled by the OSS,” Colonel Armagno said. “In fact, their support will only get better.”

The new OGI will establish a 21st Space Wing Intelligence Center of Excellence and continue to provide decision-quality intelligence to the wing and provide support to Team Pete mission partners. OGI also will support the wing and its 14 geographically separated operational units with its superior products and analysis, Colonel Armagno said.

“There are incredible professionals providing incredible intelligence worldwide,” Colonel Armagno said. “I’m proud of our Intel shop and I look forward to their continued success.”

The intelligence flight was one of seven commanded by Lt. Col. Troy Endicott, 21st Operations Support Squadron commander. The reorganization of intelligence professionals is an integral part of the Air Force-wide Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance strategy. And, Colonel Endicott said the 21st OSS “Rams” are pleased to lead the charge in this Air Force-wide transition.

“I’ll admit, I’ve truly enjoyed commanding our intelligence flight,” Colonel Endicott said. “Since May 2009, I’ve had the pleasure and joy to be charged with five officers and 21 enlisted Airmen – all of great caliber and each with significant talents, experience, dreams and goals.”

Among the flight is a former Air Force level honor guard Airman who worked President Barack Obama’s inauguration and Presidents Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon’s state funerals; the fastest guy in the wing with a 15:38 5K time; and an energetic lieutenant who, “puts many laser physicists to shame,” Colonel Endicott said. The flight has earned numerous awards and includes Airmen who have earned individual awards, including the 14th Air Force ISR Airman of the Year and the ALS John Levitow Award.

“Our team has stood out and grown as we executed one of our five stated squadron goals of providing unmatched space-focused intelligence,” Colonel Endicott said. “I look forward to seeing our team continue to unlock their potential at the group level.”

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