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Schriever Sentinel

Firefighters conduct hands-on training at Schriever

Airman 1st Class Tyler King, 10th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter from U.S. Air Force Academy, climbs up to the confined space training tower July 26 as part of Rescue 1 Technician course. The course is an advanced course designed for Department of Defense firefighters to teach them ropes courses, low-angles, high line systems and confined spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes)

By Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

Front Range firefighters conducted a hands-on confined space training July 26 at Schriever as part of their Rescue 1 Technician course.

“The course is an advanced course designed for Department of Defense firefighters to teach them ropes courses, low-angles, high line systems and confined spaces,” said Staff Sgt. Roy Heron, 312th Training Squadron firefighter instructor from Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas.

Twelve firefighters from Schriever, Peterson Air Force Base, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station and U.S. Air Force Academy participated in three days of classroom training before applying what they learned in various scenarios during 12 days of hands-on training.

During the confined space training, instructors taught the firefighters the different types of openings, how to properly monitor equipment and rig a system on a tripod.

“We also taught them how to lower people down and give them all aspects of rules and regulations from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety,” Heron said.

The hands-on portion of the confined space training was conducted at Schriever because of its perfect training facility, Heron said.

For Agustin Obregon, 50th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, the training was a good learning experience.

“This is one of the more physical and technical training [courses] I’ve had,” Obregon said. “I really enjoyed it. The instructors really taught us well.”

Heron said the confined space facility is amazing because of the realism it provided for the training. It gave them crawl spaces and entanglements but in a safe environment.

“It gave the firefighters that sense of realism,” he said. “This is important because in the real world, we are not always fighting fires. We do have rescues that we have to do in confined spaces.”

Though the course is not part of certification, the course is designed for firefighters to be proficient at conducting rescue operations.

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