Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Schriever Sentinel

50 SFS conducts realistic active-shooter training

Personnel with the 50th Security Forces Squadron respond to a threat during an active-shooter live scenario training Monday as part of its annual training program, which includes approximately 20 hours of combined training via classroom, practical applications and live scenarios. Adding realism to the scenarios were the actors playing victims and simulating threats as well as the use of simunitions, a paintball-type weapon. (U.S. Air Force photos/Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes)

By Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

The 50th Security Forces Squadron conducted active-shooter response training Monday as part of its annual training program, which includes approximately 20 hours of combined training via classroom, practical applications and live scenarios.

“We are just gearing up to protect the base against these types of threats,” said Master Sgt. Bradley Krause, 50 SFS NCO in charge of training.

The classroom portion basically showed the students how to enter a facility, how to communicate, move together as a team, reach the threat and safety throughout the environment.

During the live scenario, the training began with a smaller scenario then increased the amount of stimulus for the students as they progressed.

“We do a crawl, walk, run phase,” Krause said.

As part of the training, four security forces personnel respond to a threat, enter the facility, eliminate the threat and clear the building.

“They also check for innocent bystanders, search them, make sure they are OK, render any self-aid buddy care and secure the perimeter of the facility,” Krause said.

Adding realism to the scenarios were the actors playing victims and simulating threats as well as the use of simunitions, a paintball-type weapon.

“This is very realistic,” said Krause. “We are using simunitions so they can actually have a pain compliance when they get shot or they could see if they get shot. It has an action and reaction type of scenario. It is lifelike.”

As one of the students, Staff Sgt. Niles Bartram, 50 SFS area supervisor, said the shoot house provided much needed realism in a safe environment.

“It has the ability to change the room configurations and you’re entering to large and small hallways as well as different size rooms,” Bartram said. “I think it’s excellent that we have a shoot house on site for us to practice different active-shooter and close-quarters combat scenarios. It gives Airmen the opportunity to interact with both hostiles and friendlies in a dynamic environment.”

Krause said with this type of training, the Airmen can understand what it feels like when they go through a door when somebody else is shooting at them, instead of possibly freezing up when they need to be reacting to the threat.

Bartram echoed the same sentiment and said this training is beneficial to the security forces personnel.

“This will allow us to better serve the base populace and respond to any kind of hostile threats, secure any areas as necessary and save life and property,” Bartram said.

To Top