Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Fort Carson Mountaineer

Old cavalry visits new Army

Staff Sgt. Jason Stacy, infantryman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, explains how infantrymen use the M240B machine gun, both mounted and unmounted, from the M2A3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle, during the Korean War Veterans 7th Cavalry Association annual reunion, held at Fort Carson, Aug. 21.

Story and photos by Staff Sgt. Andrew Porch

2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office, 4th Infantry Division

“They are part of a brotherhood, something greater than themselves. To have them here as people who forged the way for modern tactics is amazing,” said Capt. Nicholas Barwikowski.

The commander, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, and his Soldiers hosted 27 members of the Korean War Veterans 7th Cavalry Regiment Association, during their annual reunion, on Fort Carson, Aug. 21.

“It’s a huge honor and a privilege for me,” said Staff Sgt. Jason Stacy, infantryman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Bn., 8th Inf. Reg. “We wanted to show some appreciation for what they have done and how they led the way for us. They fought hard in Korea with a lot less equipment.”

Stacy, the battalion’s master gunner, introduced the veterans to current infantry equipment and weaponry, to include the M2A3 Bradley Fighting Vehicle, M4 carbine and basic body armor.

“The Army might have changed a lot, but we are still the same basic Army,” said Stacy. “We are still go- getters; we are still young guys ready to go out there and defend this country until the end.”

The veterans praised the unit and the Soldiers for their individual service.

“I think they are very well trained and well educated,” said retired Army 1st Sgt. Bernard Brown. “We appreciate the job that they are doing”

After the presentation, the veterans had the opportunity to watch the infantrymen attempt to earn their expert infantry badge.

“They get to see the Army evolving,” said Barwikowski. “These guys are Korean War vets (from) one of the hardest wars we have ever fought in. They get to come here today and see the Army they were in has evolved and gotten better through the things they learned. We haven’t forgotten their lesson.”

The “Talon” Soldiers appreciated the chance to interact with the veterans.

“I would gladly do it again if they asked,” said Stacy. “They paved the way for Soldiers like us. They left us a proud military tradition to continue on, work towards and be a part of. That’s something that is hard to put into words.”

To Top