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Schriever Sentinel

Lock shop holds keys to Schriever doors

Above: Airman 1st Class Josh Roy Carver, 50th Civil Engineer Squadron structures journeyman, prepares to cut a key Monday, at Schriever Air Force Base. The lock shop maintains more than 5,000 keys for Schriever personnel.

Above: Airman 1st Class Josh Roy Carver, 50th Civil Engineer Squadron structures journeyman, prepares to cut a key Monday, at Schriever Air Force Base. The lock shop maintains more than 5,000 keys for Schriever personnel.

By Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

They open a lot of doors for Team Schriever members; they literally hold the keys to most doors on base. They are the 50th Civil Engineer Squadron Structure Lock Shop.

“Our primary function is to control and manage base keys,” said Staff Sgt. Cody Ott, 50 CES structure shop craftsman. “We issue, make and cut keys and set up doors and locks.”

The eight-member lock shop team oversees more than 5,000 keys, which they either store, or distribute to military, civilian and contractor personnel working at Schriever.

“We have an automated tracking system for all of our keys,” said Ott. “It tracks every key we’ve ever made, which employee has the key, where it’s at, what door it goes to and the cut pattern.”

Additionally, they also manage a lot of the containers and safes on base.

“We have to inspect and maintain them and ensure they are working properly,” said Staff Sgt. Brian Jackson, 50 CES structure shop craftsman.

The lock shop delegated the “keys,” or the passwords, to units, which have the responsibility to maintain all the documentation for the safe.

With the amount of keys they need to manage, the lock shop maintains accountability for every single one of them.

“The 50th Space Wing policy states that we have to keep track of those keys,” Ott said. “It is a huge security issue if people start losing or trading keys.”

It is for this reason that personnel have to go through the lock shop before leaving the base.

“If people need keys, they have to come see us,” Jackson said. “We issue those keys out to them in the system, and we are actually in their virtual out-processing checklist.”

With this system, Schriever members are not allowed to trade, transfer or to pass off your keys without going through the lock shop, Ott said. If they’ve lost their key, the shop handles it on a case by case basis, depending on what type of key it is.

Though the shop doesn’t manage all of the keys on base, they are always there to provide support when needed.

“When they ask for our help, we can always give them a hand,” Jackson said.

Ott commended the lock shop personnel for their dedication and work ethic.

“The team work is awesome; we have a great working relationship here,” he said.

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