Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Schriever Sentinel

Boot Camp, FIP take fitness to higher level

U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes Airmen perform sit-ups during a Boot Camp class April 2, 2014, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. Boot Camp was designed by the 50th Mission Support Group leadership in September 2010 to help Schriever Air Force Base Airmen pass their fitness assessment. In addition to Boot Camp, the Schriever Fitness Center also offers a Fitness Improvement Program, which focuses more on strength and endurance.

U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes
Airmen perform sit-ups during a Boot Camp class April 2, 2014, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. Boot Camp was designed by the 50th Mission Support Group leadership in September 2010 to help Schriever Air Force Base Airmen pass their fitness assessment. In addition to Boot Camp, the Schriever Fitness Center also offers a Fitness Improvement Program, which focuses more on strength and endurance.

By Staff Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

Taking fitness to a higher level takes time, commitment and effort. Fortunately, the Schriever Fitness Center offers Boot Camp and the Fitness Improvement Program to help Airmen reach that next step.

Boot Camp was designed by the 50th Mission Support Group leadership in September 2010 to help Schriever Air Force Base Airmen pass their fitness assessment. Back then, the program was heavily loaded with pushups, sit-ups and distance runs.

“Our trainers modified the program a little bit so the participants weren’t basically running every single day, and it gave them a break,” said Seth Cannello, Schriever sports and fitness manager. “They introduced interval training and more specific strength training.”

They improved Boot Camp and transformed it into a more rigorous and full-body workout throughout the week. On Mondays, participants take their mock fitness assessment including waist measurement, pushup, sit-up and 1.5 mile run.

“It is a way to give them a baseline on where they are in terms of their fitness,” said Cannello. “For most of the people who participate in our Boot Camp, their goal is to pass or improve their fitness test. We want to see if there is any improvement from week to week.”

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, participants conduct interval training, while on Wednesdays and Fridays, they concentrate on pushups and sit-ups, and then run at least 3 miles thereafter. The instructors designed the current Boot Camp to break the monotony of working out.

“We do something different every day,” said CJ Thornton, Schriever Fitness Center personal trainer and one of the Boot Camp instructors. “Boot Camp is one of those new things that are good for you to learn.”

Thornton said a lot of times, people will get used to their workout routines and just go through the repetitive motions.

“You just do the same work out, the same everyday routine,” he said. “[Meanwhile], Boot Camp takes you out of your comfort zone and makes you look at how you’re running. Are you running efficiently? Are you running with good proper form? Is your breathing labored?”

Thornton added that though Boot Camp is mandatory for some Airmen, it is still open to everyone, including already fit Airmen and civilians.

“You don’t have to fail your fitness assessment to go to Boot Camp,” he said. “If you need help with your run, pushups or sit-ups, you can come in and get help with that.”

Another class that may benefit Schriever Airmen is the FIP. The fitness center staff offers FIP classes at 1 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

“The program is open to anybody,” said Cannello. “They do more circuit and interval types of workouts, such as the high-intensity interval training, or HIIT.”

FIP focuses more on strength and endurance, Thornton added. Units or members may attend classes as long as they call the fitness center to reserve a spot.

“It will really help you with anything you need, especially if you need more strength training,” he said. “You can really work on your core, pushup and sit-up; it is more like a full body workout.”

Cannello said improving fitness is necessary because it makes activities of daily living easier.

“It prolongs your life and allows you to function better when your mind and body are stressed,” he said. “I think fitness is the most important thing a person can do for themselves and for their family. Without your health, you have nothing.”

For more information, call the Schriever Fitness Center at 567-6628.

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