Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Schriever Sentinel

Drunk driving will cost you more than a beer

U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Damon Kasberg The Front Range Airmen Against Drunk Driving has saved nearly 100 lives so far this year. A2D2 can be reached at 552-AADD(2233). Don’t take the risk of drinking and driving.
U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Damon Kasberg The Front Range Airmen Against Drunk Driving has saved nearly 100 lives so far this year. A2D2 can be reached at 552-AADD(2233). Don’t take the risk of drinking and driving.

U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Damon Kasberg
The Front Range Airmen Against Drunk Driving has saved nearly 100 lives so far this year. A2D2 can be reached at 552-AADD(2233). Don’t take the risk of drinking and driving.

By Senior Airman Naomi Griego

50th Space Wing Public Affairs

“You can’t replace lives,” said Staff Sgt. Jefrey Davis.

According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving, a person is injured in a drunk driving crash every two minutes. And the rate of drunk driving is highest among 21 to 25 year olds.

Davis, 4th Space Operations Squadron and Front Range Airmen Against Drunk Driving president, wants to combat this statistic with education and reminding members of the resources available through A2D2.

“We provide a safe ride home for any military member, retiree, Guard, Reserve or military contractor for Schriever and Peterson Air Force Bases and Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station,” said Davis. “But we also want to be the last resort.”

He said it’s frustrating to hear about any driving under the influence cases occurring, but especially with Airmen.

“I always think to myself we had x amount of volunteers that night,” Davis said.

Master Sgt. Erin French, 50th Mission Support Group and wing staff agency first sergeant, encourages members to consider using A2D2 in the moment they need them the most versus having to encounter the professional and personal consequences of driving while impaired or under the influence.

“It’s a free ride home, no questions asked, versus upwards of approximately $15,000 in legal fees, not to mention the career implications and risk of loss of life,” French said.

She said Airmen have friends, supervisors, first sergeants and commanders immediately available to assist getting their personnel home safe.

“I hope the people who do use A2D2 encourage others to use them as well,” she added. “It’s just not worth the consequences to drink and drive.”

A2D2 is available anytime from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. During holiday weekends, their hours are extended.

“We want people to know we’re here,” he said. “We’re here if you need a ride or if you would like to volunteer your time and effort to make a difference.”

Davis, who has been the president since last December, said he enjoys being able to help others through the program.

“So far this year, we estimated nearly 100 lives saved,” said Davis.

The volunteer program averages four calls every weekend but on some weekends, they get at most 15 calls.

“As a supervisor, I tell my Airmen to call me anytime they need a ride,” he said.

As someone who has been personally affected by alcohol impaired driving, he understands what a life changer a DUI can be.

“It inspires me and frustrates me to be a part of A2D2,” he said. “I’d rather people had made a plan before drinking but I also rather them not endanger anyone’s life, including their own.”

He wants everyone to know the organization is not against drinking; they’re anti-drinking and driving.

Anyone interested in volunteering should contact their unit representatives or just show up to the Eclipse Café for a safety briefing at Peterson Air Force Base at 10 p.m. on a night the service is available.

For more information on A2D2, or how to volunteer, call 552-AADD(2233) or email them at airmenagainst.dd@us.af.mil.

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