Colorado Springs Military Newspaper Group

Peterson Space Observer

Detachment 4 graduates first training class

(courtesy photo) BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The first class from the Upgraded Early Warning Radar course graduated Feb. 11, 2016. The course is hosted by Detachment 4, 21st Operations Group at Beale.
(courtesy photo) BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The first class from the Upgraded Early Warning Radar course graduated Feb. 11, 2016. The course is hosted by Detachment 4, 21st Operations Group at Beale.

(courtesy photo)
BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The first class from the Upgraded Early Warning Radar course graduated Feb. 11, 2016. The course is hosted by Detachment 4, 21st Operations Group at Beale.

By Dave Smith

21st Space Wing Public Affairs staff writer

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.  —  The newest addition to the 21st Operations Group is not wasting any time fulfilling its mission to train Airmen in the use of Upgraded Early Warning Radar. The detachment is a geographically separated unit of the 21st Space Wing located at Beale Air Force Base near Yuba City, California.

The detachment was activated Dec. 8 when Col. Troy Endicott, 21st OG commander passed the guidon to Capt. Jonathan Brydie, Detachment 4 commander. The reason behind the activation is related to changes in how the Air Education and Training Command offers training. The AETC no longer provides training for unique weapons systems used by certain units. Now the units are in charge of their own training for the equipment, which is why training for the UEWR is happening at Beale AFB.

“Beale is the only stateside GSU with a UEWR,” Brydie said. “This location gives us the resources we need to ensure Airmen and allies are tactically trained and knowledgeable on these systems.”

The first official training class began Jan. 4 and ran through Feb. 11. Brydie said the capacity for the class is eight students, but for the first class only had six. The class is made up of Airmen from Clear Air Force Station, Alaska, Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

Flexibility is a benefit of the unit being in charge of its own training. Brydie said the previous method had some limitations, but now class focus can be changed as needed.

“These systems are constantly changing. We can bring in a mix of things, we have the liberty to make changes on the spot,” said Brydie. “Now that it is done in the unit, we can change with the unit.”

The 21st OG manages the operations units of the 21st SW covering the entire globe. The 21st OG is located at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Its mission is command and control of missile warning and space control units, providing real-time missile warning, attack assessments and space control.

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