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Peterson Space Observer

CMAFS SFS trains with Fire Department

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN AIR FORCE STATION, Colo. — The Cheyenne Mountain Complex located on Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station poses unique challenges to all who work there. For the fire department, it provides them a chance to hone their subterranean, industrial and ventilation capabilities, according to Senior Master Sgt. David Webster, CMAFS deputy fire chief.

The CMAFS fire station recently conducted training with the 21st Security Forces Squadron operating at CMAFS, training them as fire augmentees.

“Partnering with security forces is essential for interoperability,” Webster said. “More specifically, as first responders that arrive and work together on-scene seamlessly.”

1st Lt. John Theulen, 21st SFS operations officer, first came up with the idea for the training during a tour of the mountain.

“During the tour, they described the complex like a Navy ship,” said Theulen. “So I had the thought to mimic one of the Navy requirements where they train everyone on the ship as a firefighter augmentee.”

Theulen’s operations team worked closely with the fire department’s leadership to set up a two-day training for his team. Day one started with walking through the complex and going over fire gear and procedures. The second day was filled with three hands-on stations in the fire departments training area.

Station one enabled training with a fire hose, and station two was an overview of the training tower and its capabilities. Station three allowed the security forces members to use some breaching and extracting tools.

“Fire [personnel] also walked us through what their official procedures for vehicle accidents are,” Theulen explained.

As of now security forces at CMAFS has been trained on mass notifications systems, incident management and motor vehicle response with the fire department.

 “Besides receiving some much needed training, these days helped security forces and fire [department] build our relationship as first responders on the mountain,” Theulen said. “Security forces has already been a part of fire exercises since the training, and we plan to continue building and sharpening our joint response procedures.”

According to Webster, when you know and train fellow first responders, it increases the ability to mitigate emergencies quicker than when you don’t.

“Security forces members give 110% no matter the circumstances,” Webster said. “Knowing the caliber of professional Airmen we have defending the installation is a good feeling. Especially seeing how they strive for perfection by seeking out training opportunities.”

The Cheyenne Mountain Complex located on Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station poses unique challenges to all who work there. For the fire department, it provides them a chance to hone their subterranean, industrial and ventilation capabilities, according to Senior Master Sgt. David Webster, CMAFS deputy fire chief.

The CMAFS fire station recently conducted training with the 21st Security Forces Squadron operating at CMAFS, training them as fire augmentees.

“Partnering with security forces is essential for interoperability,” Webster said. “More specifically, as first responders that arrive and work together on-scene seamlessly.”

1st Lt. John Theulen, 21st SFS operations officer, first came up with the idea for the training during a tour of the mountain.

“During the tour, they described the complex like a Navy ship,” said Theulen. “So I had the thought to mimic one of the Navy requirements where they train everyone on the ship as a firefighter augmentee.”

Theulen’s operations team worked closely with the fire department’s leadership to set up a two-day training for his team. Day one started with walking through the complex and going over fire gear and procedures. The second day was filled with three hands-on stations in the fire departments training area.

Station one enabled training with a fire hose, and station two was an overview of the training tower and its capabilities. Station three allowed the security forces members to use some breaching and extracting tools.

“Fire [personnel] also walked us through what their official procedures for vehicle accidents are,” Theulen explained.

As of now security forces at CMAFS has been trained on mass notifications systems, incident management and motor vehicle response with the fire department.

 “Besides receiving some much needed training, these days helped security forces and fire [department] build our relationship as first responders on the mountain,” Theulen said. “Security forces has already been a part of fire exercises since the training, and we plan to continue building and sharpening our joint response procedures.”

According to Webster, when you know and train fellow first responders, it increases the ability to mitigate emergencies quicker than when you don’t.

“Security forces members give 110% no matter the circumstances,” Webster said. “Knowing the caliber of professional Airmen we have defending the installation is a good feeling. Especially seeing how they strive for perfection by seeking out training opportunities.”

CMAFS SFS trains with Fire Department
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